Kilimanjaro

Kilimanjaro
Mount Kilimanjaro, located in the eastern area of Tanzania, is the tallest freestanding mountain in the world. From base to summit, Kilimanjaro stands over 15,000 feet tall. The mountain has three volcanic cones named Kibo, Mawenzi, and Shira, though it is no longer an active volcano. Although Kilimanjaro’s etymology is unknown, many linguists posit that it is a composite of Swahili and Kichagga words that when combined mean “white mountain”. Mount Kilimanjaro is a very popular tourist locale. There are quite a few paths that visitors can use in order to scale the mountain. Because of its height and majesty, Kilimanjaro will continue to attract visitors eager to make the difficult climb.

Kilimanjaro was formed approximately o­ne million years ago from lava that flowed freely from the Rift Valley. Although the mountain has played a major part in the agriculture and culture of the indigenous people for hundreds of years, the British first mapped it in 1963. The first tourist maps were published in 1989. Despite this, the first recorded ascent occurred in 1889. The Tanzania government has issued climbing guidelines in order to prepare individuals for the difficulty of the climb. The high attitude and low temperatures can cause breathing difficulties, headaches, and high altitude pulmonary edema. However, people who are physically fit and take the proper emergency precautions should be able to reach the summit.

Kilimanjaro
Because of its incredible height, Kilimanjaro has unique vegetation. Plant life o­n the mountain has evolved in order to adapt to extreme altitudes and varying temperatures. Kilimanjaro has a number of different forest and herbivore species that inhabit them.

Kilimanjaro is a natural marvel. In addition to being a dormant volcano, the mountain nurtures a diverse array of plant and animal life. It offers a wealth of opportunities for those with an adventurous spirit.